SEN Support in Schools – We’re Missing the Point

Having been through the broken and very frustrating EHCP process in the UK this last 2 years, I firmly believe that a wholistic approach to supporting each child’s needs would be far better for everyone.

We have fought and succeeded in having provision of weekly sensory integration/ occupational therapy for Charlie. It has come 4 years after he most needed it. It doesn’t feel like a victory yet because the provision for the other children in the city, the school and in the wider system hasn’t changed.

I feel like I am walking a fine line, we are in a system where “he who shouts the loudest and wisest” get what he wants or needs. In shouting I hope I am not just getting “what I want” or solely what my child needs, but also raising the voice of others too, I pray that I am breaking new ground for others too

It Must Be Mum

Every school-age child with a special educational need (SEN) should have a written plan of support.  Every single one.  That is my interpretation of the SEN Code of Practice (SEN COP) and I will explain why. 

Published in June 2014, Chapter 6 of the SEN COP describes the provision of SEN Support in Schools.  It describes a system that is far removed from the days of Individual Education Plans and from setting targets for children who are not achieving someone else’s idea of ‘good enough’ progress.

The new approach talks about children fulfilling their potential, about achieving their best.  It talks about understanding barriers to learning and providing support.  Critically, nowhere, anywhere, does it talk about targets.  Implied is: ‘make the environment right for the child and they will progress’. 

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Lack of imagination in autism is not what you may think

Lack of imagination in Autism is not always what you may think

faithmummy


What do you think of when you think of imagination? Do you think of children making up games, people writing fiction stories, or perhaps role play? It is true that all of these, and so much more, require imagination yet imagination is so much more than just forming new ideas and being creative.
Many autistic children (and adults) struggle with a special type of imagination called social imagination.

Firstly let me explain what this is NOT:
1. It is NOT the ability to be creative. 

In fact many people with autism are highly gifted artists or musicians and have unique and highly talented ways of presenting their ability.

If your child is diagnosed with autism it does NOT mean they will not be good at drawing, or be able to express themselves in creative ways.

2. It is NOT a lack of ability to play with toys or act out…

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